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Chemical safety in the World of Work:  A Global View on Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems  - Shared screen with speaker view
HAZLINA YON
36:19
hi everyone. We are in the IOMC Toolbox Chem Management?
Пронина Татьяна
40:24
Yes, but in one hour
Andrea Cararo
01:42:02
Andrea Cararo (UNITAR): andrea.cararo@unitar.org
Federico Moncada
01:44:07
Greetings from Honduras!
Clemens Ruepert
01:45:34
Also greetings from Costa Rica
Pablo Oliva
01:46:26
hello, Greetings from Guatemala
C Guzman- Q
01:49:23
greetings from Guatemala
Divine Kavunga
01:49:47
Greetings from the US
Dr KUIPOUO
01:50:39
Greetings from CREPD Cameroon
Yupa
01:50:49
Greeting from Myanmar
Karma’s iPhone
01:51:25
greeting from Himalayan kingdom of BHUTAN
Andrea Cararo
01:51:42
IOMC Toolbox website: http://www.iomctoolbox.org/
EOD UMFCCI
01:53:22
Will all the PPTs on this Webinar be shared?
Kov Bunthoeun
01:53:55
Greeting from Cambodia, Ministry of Labour and Vocational Training. Please upload the presentation file to us as well.
Andrea Cararo
01:53:56
yes! We are going to upload the presentations here on the chat box.
EOD UMFCCI
01:54:15
Thanks
Federico Moncada
01:57:39
¿is chromium within the chemical agenda for ILO Chemical Safety branch?
Kov Bunthoeun
01:57:53
Thank you alot
Halshka Graczyk (ILO)
01:58:54
Hi Federico, yes, the ILO covers all metals that may be hazardous for workers' health, chromium as well.
Federico Moncada
01:59:47
Perfect! Thanks for the feedback!
Dr KUIPOUO
02:00:24
How about exposure to particles like silica dust in the mining industry (artisanal and industrial)?
Halshka Graczyk (ILO)
02:01:48
Yes we also cover silica dust, which is still a very significant exposure in the world of work
Federico Moncada
02:06:02
¿what about safe work methodology?
Rory O'Neill
02:06:14
Some chromium salts (notably chrome VI) should also be subject to the more absolute requirements of the carcinogens convention C.139).
Federico Moncada
02:07:04
chromium III shouldn’t be diminished either.
Kov Bunthoeun
02:07:45
Some countries don't have a list occupational diseases so can you share also how can we do to develop it?
Rory O'Neill
02:07:57
Silica has been the subject of a number of ILO silicosis elimination programmes. Exposure standards have been generally grossly inadequate - better nations are looking at as low as 0.025mg/m3. Higher than this increases significantly the risk of lung and other cancers, obstructive and restrictive lung diseases and autoimmune diseases.
Dr KUIPOUO
02:08:48
Including silicosis
Rory O'Neill
02:08:59
Yup.
Jagdish Patel,PTRC
02:09:56
In countries like India 93% workers are in informal sector and they have no legal protection for safety & health at work. We have found workers working in Shops exposed to fine silica dust during sand blasting for glass itching
Rory O'Neill
02:09:59
For occupational disease lists, the ILO list is a very helpful starting point for negotiations on a national list. It depends on the national system where these negotiations will take place - ministry of labour, welfare or compensation agencies
Dr KUIPOUO
02:10:03
What is the gender dimension in the work of ILO occupational exposure to chemical
Rory O'Neill
02:12:01
Jadgish makes a very important point on informal labour. We believe all international norms should apply to all workers, not just employees. There is also a responsibility on major companies in supply chains to take responsibility for the firms producing or processing materials for them.
Rory O'Neill
02:13:04
Full agreement on Chrome III risks.
Jagdish Patel,PTRC
02:13:18
Workers need to be empowered but political system do not allow
Rory O'Neill
02:14:18
Empowerment is certainly key. This is why unions believe health and safety is a critical organising focus. www.hazards.org/organise
Richard Brown, WHO HQ
02:14:58
International Chemical Safety Cards:- https://www.ilo.org/dyn/icsc/showcard.home
Richard Brown, WHO HQ
02:15:30
https://www.ilo.org/safework/info/publications/WCMS_113134/lang--en/index.htm
Sucelly
02:16:04
Greetings from Guatemala, thanks for the information!
Clemens Ruepert
02:17:16
Indeed the updating of the cards is very important.
Richard Brown, WHO HQ
02:17:37
ICSCs are available in:- EnglishFrenchSpanishFinnishHebrewHungarianItalianJapanesePolishRussianChinese
Federico Moncada
02:22:30
Thanks Rory O’Neil!
Jagdish Patel,PTRC
02:28:38
In India from the brokenships asbestos sheets are taken out, sold and those who buy manufacture stoves which are popular locally
Jagdish Patel,PTRC
02:32:58
I have seen community in labor areasusing plastic waste used in stoves as fuel to boil water for bath. IN narrow lane on both sides you can see the stoves in the morning from where lot of black fumes rising
Rory O'Neill
02:33:10
Big gender dimension on chemical exposures, particularly as PPE is rarely designed for women, studies frequently are based on male dominated industries and male exposures, other studies are not disaggregated and risks are frequently different. There is also a problem for protective measures to be discriminatory - for example, lead regulations typically treated lead as reproductive hazard only to women, when male exposures are of course as problematic.
Federico Moncada
02:34:42
In Honduras we have a study of the impact of mercury in communities as well as family to mine and artisanal. Quite a topic still to approach!
Rory O'Neill
02:36:28
Occupational cancer prevention is a major priority for global unions. See our webpage at www.hazards.org/cancer and our blog at www.cancerhazards.org. We have also published in several languages a 'Work cancer causes' poster.http://www.hazards.org/cancer/work/index.htm
Richard Brown, WHO HQ
02:38:03
Asbestos - hazards and safe practices for clean up after earthquake (would also apply to other natural disasters):-https://www.who.int/hac/crises/chn/asbestos/en/
Rory O'Neill
02:38:15
HI there. Thanks for the informative session. I am afraid I have to leave for another meeting. Rory
Jagdish Patel,PTRC
02:39:18
There is lot of literature and discussion on OCc cancer but in few countries do we see identification and compensation for Occ cancers. In countries like India we have no data on occ cancers and we do not know how many of them claim and won compensation.
Bert De Wel
02:39:31
How/Is the precautionary approach from the Rio Declaration included in the Toolbox?
Federico Moncada
02:41:48
The RoHS! Quite a topic too nowadays!
Richard Brown, WHO HQ
02:42:42
Chemical releases caused by natural hazard events and disastershttps://www.who.int/publications/i/item/chemical-releases-caused-by-natural-hazard-events-and-disasters(EN, CH, FR, RU, SP)
Richard Brown, WHO HQ
02:56:23
new languages for International Chemical Safety Cards (in progress or starting soon):-ThaiTamilKoreanSinhalesePortuguesePersianArabicothers to follow later
Chungsik Yoon
02:58:41
Thank you guys for very infromative presentation. I need to leave soon. I'd like to know ILO or EU or other country are concerning about the trade secrets in chemial products. In Korea, the government enforced the trade secrets in chemcial products to regiister before enlisting in SDS.
Jagdish Patel,PTRC
02:59:57
Humidifier pesticides in Korea played havoc
HAZLINA YON
03:00:42
In Malaysia we have a provision on Confidential business information in the CLASS regulations 2013
Chungsik Yoon
03:05:19
Hazlina Yon, Thank you for your info and sorry for leaving before your talk.
HAZLINA YON
03:06:42
Ms Yoon, You can email me if you need more information.
Halshka Graczyk (ILO)
03:10:26
We will try to answer questions here since we are running late and won't have time for Q&A. Dear Bert, your question on the precautionary approach - The IOMC toolbox has separate schemes for different areas of chem management. Different organisations include their own tools in each scheme. The precautionary approach is included within organisation's specific tools. For example ILO standards and guidance that are included in the Toolbox's OSH management scheme integrate the precautionary approach for chemicals and within specific sectors.
Halshka Graczyk (ILO)
03:13:59
Dear Kov: Here are the links to ILO Occupational disease list: https://www.ilo.org/safework/info/publications/WCMS_125137/lang--en/index.htm
tan eng hong
03:18:03
hi! my question to Malaysia Pn Hazina Yon. if your recall on the 4th May 2019 NIOSH propose the government to ractify convention 155 and 170 of ILO. My question is what is the present Malaysian government stand on ractifing both the convention which is long overdue?
Federico Moncada
03:21:27
hello, regarding the safe work methodology for risk analysis, how or better said, is it a more specific approach for the chemical setting? Agriculture workers are the most affected. Which approach should be considered or complimented? Thanks
Halshka Graczyk (ILO)
03:21:29
Dr KUIPOUO: thank you for the important question. There is a significant gender dimension on chemical exposures that needs more investigation. It is important to note that all ILO legal instruments refer to “all workers” ensuring that both men and women are protected from chemical hazards, in the workplace as well as in the wider community. As Rory also mentioned, PPE is rarely designed for women, studies frequently are based on male dominated industries and male exposures, other studies are not disaggregated and risks are frequently very different. Woman also have specific windows of vulnerability, like pregnancy.
Halshka Graczyk (ILO)
03:23:06
Dear Federico, we have ILO instruments that are sector specific for the agricultural sector, for example the ILO Agriculture Convention https://www.ilo.org/dyn/normlex/en/f?p=NORMLEXPUB:12100:0::NO::P12100_INSTRUMENT_ID:312315 and the Code of practice https://www.ilo.org/global/publications/books/WCMS_159457/lang--en/index.htm
Halshka Graczyk (ILO)
03:23:21
Dear Federico, we have ILO instruments that are sector specific for the agricultural sector, for example the ILO Agriculture Convention https://www.ilo.org/dyn/normlex/en/f?p=NORMLEXPUB:12100:0::NO::P12100_INSTRUMENT_ID:312315 and the Code of practice https://www.ilo.org/global/publications/books/WCMS_159457/lang--en/index.htm
Dr KUIPOUO
03:24:12
Thanks Halshka for this reply. My point is much about the particular vulnerability of women due to thier particular biology and metabolism as far as exposure to chemicals is concern
Rory O'Neill
03:24:44
Hazards and the global union confederation ITUC at-a-glance guide to work cancers and their causes.http://www.hazards.org/cancer/work/index.htmLes cancers et leurs causes professionnelleshttp://www.hazards.org/cancer/work/cancercauses_fr.htmTipos de cáncer y causas relacionadas con el trabajoDe kankers en hun beroepsgerelateerde oorzakenResources• Hazards cancer webpage• Hazards chemicals webpage
Rory O'Neill
03:25:04
Tipos de cáncer y causas relacionadas con el trabajohttp://www.hazards.org/cancer/work/cancercauses_es.htm
Rory O'Neill
03:25:30
De kankers en hun beroepsgerelateerde oorzakenhttp://www.hazards.org/cancer/work/cancercauses_nl.htm
Halshka Graczyk (ILO)
03:26:13
Yes women have particularly vulnerability due to many physiological differences; they are more likely to store chemicals in adipose tissues, have different metabolic processes for detoxification pathways and of course this important point of windows of susceptibility and different targeted actions of chemicals on the female reproductive system
Halshka Graczyk (ILO)
03:27:14
And importantly, the mechanism of action of each chemical will be different and have their own gender dimension
Priya
03:30:34
Unfortunately employers especially in the SME are oblivious to gender issues and see it as a problem and a loss of resource. This area requires strengthening at a global level.
Dr KUIPOUO
03:30:56
Good then how all these specificities are translated into protective policies in ILO?
Halshka Graczyk (ILO)
03:30:57
Absolutely agree Priya
heinn
03:32:18
Andrea
heinn
03:32:21
You are muted
Kov Bunthoeun
03:32:54
Great presentation from both of you
Halshka Graczyk (ILO)
03:33:18
Dr Kuipouo, our international labour standards include stipulations to protect all workers including women. And additionally, there are certain protections for women. For example the ILO Maternity Protection Convention (No. 183) sets out that pregnant women should not be obliged to carry out work that is a significant risk to her health and safety or that of her child. It outlines the need for the elimination of any workplace risk, additional paid leave to avoid exposure if the risk cannot be eliminated, and the right to return to her job or an equivalent job as soon as it is safe for her to do so.The accompanying Recommendation (No.191) provides for specific risk assessment and management of risks concerning pregnant women, including: work involving exposure to biological, chemical or physical agents which represent a reproductive health hazard.Ref: https://www.ilo.org/dyn/normlex/en/f?p=NORMLEXPUB:12100:0::NO::P12100_ILO_CODE:C183
Andrea Cararo
03:35:13
Azzi, Manal: azzi@ilo.org
Andrea Cararo
03:35:36
Graczyk, Halshka: graczyk@ilo.org
HAZLINA YON
03:35:48
thank you to all. Sorry for some technical issues just now.
Andrea Cararo
03:36:03
Kaspar Schmid: kasparschmid@gmail.com
HAZLINA YON
03:36:15
hazlina@mohr.gov.my
Andrea Cararo
03:36:17
Hazlina Yon: hazlina@mohr.gov.my
Harimah Binti Hamdan
03:36:41
Thanks for all the presenter esp Pn Hazlina for the good sharing from Malaysia
Chuong Por
03:36:47
Thank you for this great session.
C Guzman- Q
03:37:32
thank you all!
heinn
03:37:45
Thank you all.
Federico Moncada
03:37:47
thanks for everything, ILO responds much better then WHO!
Chuong Por
03:37:48
Please continue sharing us.
Kov Bunthoeun
03:37:49
Thank you very much
Dr. Htein Linn
03:37:49
Thanks you bye bye
Yupa
03:37:51
Thank you very much all.
Priya
03:37:51
Thank you
csolal
03:37:56
Thank you to all of you
C Guzman- Q
03:37:56
maybe a little later so in America is not so early!
RZ Shamsul
03:38:01
Thanks.